The Sessions

16 & 17 November 2017 @ India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Date: 16th November, 2017

Time: 14:00PM-15:30PM

Venue: Theatre, IHC, New Delhi

Host / Co-host: GPN Studies & CRB

Session Brief:

GPN Studies and CRB are convening this multi-stakeholder consultation in order to discuss a topic of increasing relevance in a world where production is increasingly organized in global and regional value chains. Brands or lead firms in these value chains have a great influence on the economic condition of supplier firms and on employment conditions in these supplier firms. This was the core of the discussion at the 2016 International Labour Conference of the ILO.

We are convening a multi-stakeholder to discuss this topic which is important in attaining sustainable and just production in global value chains. While the focus of the discussion will be on purchasing practices and their impact on supplier firms and workers in the garment value chains, the consultation will also cover leather products and automobile value chains.

We will invite various stakeholders to participate in this half-day consultation – brands, suppliers, government and related industry bodies, associations of small and medium enterprises, workers, and civil society organizations.

Objectives:

(1) Discuss the impact of Brands’ Purchasing Practices on supplier firms and their workers.

(2) See whether there can be a consensus on the need for a Living Wage that can be earned in an 8-hour working day, in a 6-day working week to be part of purchase agreements

(3) Possible agreement to set up a multi-stakeholder discussion forum

Stake-holders to be invited for the consultation:

  • Brands
  • SME Associations
  • Suppliers
  • Trade union representatives, including those of home-workers
  • CSOs involved with activities in value chains
  • ILO
  • AEPC (as quasi government representative)
  • Researchers, lawyers and consultants

Speakers:

  1. Prof Dev Nathan, Coordinator, GPN Studies
  2. Dr. Bimal Arora, Chairperson, CRB

Date: 17th November, 2017

Time: 11:30AM-13:00PM

Venue: Theatre Hall, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi.

Host/Co-host: Green Electronics Council.

Brief Note

The IT sector has a history of relying on voluntary consensus standards to increase the environmental performance of IT products. To be “sustainable” IT products must also address their “social” performance, i.e. the social impacts associated with their manufacture, assembly and end-of-life management. Voluntary consensus standards therefore need to include “social” criteria. This session provides an overview of the IT sector within India and how social criteria can be included in IT sector voluntary consensus standards. It proposes specific capacity building criteria that are relevant to India’s approach to end-of-life management of IT products. These capacity building criteria are based on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and seek to link India’s leadership in meeting the SDGs with current end-of-life management policies.

Speakers/panelists TO BE UPDATED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Date: 17th November, 2017

Time: 11:30AM-13:00PM

Venue: Jacaranda I, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Host/Co-host: Rabobank

Brief: Sustainability standard systems in agriculture (SSA) are considered as an innovative market based approach to promote sustainable agriculture production and business practices. The SSA is being promoted by global businesses, thereby, achieving their sustainability commitment and reducing impact on footprint. The growth of these standards are well established and widely recognized. To take examples; the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) has the second-largest area of all the standards, accounting for 0.07% of the global agricultural area, GLOBALG.A.P. has more than 3.1 million hectares in 2015, making it the biggest standards in terms of area certified, Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) saw the greatest jump, with a nine fold expansion in its certified area between 2011 and 2015, the area of the Round Table for Responsible Soy (RTRS) increased nearly fivefold over the same period. However, in region dominated by small holders, standards like BONSUCRO and RTRS hasn’t grown as it was expected.

Objective

The proposed roundtable (RT) therefore address the following questions:

  • What are the consumption patterns for sustainability standards product?
  • What have recent efforts achieved?
  • Where should they be directed next?
  • What worked well?
  • What needs to be recalibrated?

Speakers/Panelist : TO BE UPDATED

Agenda

Topic
Setting Context
Sharing Performance of the standards
Business Voices
Discussion on Performance of Standards
Conclusion and follow ups

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Date: 17th November, 2017

Time: 11:30AM- 13:00 PM

Venue: Silver Oak I, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Host / Co-host : CSR Europe

Background

Human rights make business sense.

Businesses of all sizes should be seizing opportunities to secure their futures and safeguard their brand by adopting human rights policies and integrate those into their processes, thus fulfilling their responsibility to respect human rights – as outlined in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

Such integration is still a challenge for many companies and this is why CSR(E) developed the ‘Blueprint for Embedding Human Rights in Key Company Functions’:  to provide a guide for companies in driving the effort of integrating respect for human rights in their company’s DNA, drawing lessons learned directly from company practices.

Linkage with ISS 2017 Theme

Supply chain Compliance with labour standards, ILO conventions international norms including UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights is challenging. This session will show some best practice and explore how a common framework and blueprint can support individual efforts to reach scale. Fitting perfectly with the theme of ISS2017 is From the ‘Tragedies of the Commons’ to the strategies for the Commons.

Objectives of the Session

  • support Indian industry and other stakeholders understand how to develop a strategy/actions for protecting/respective human rights in their operations, along the supply chain
  • Provide Evidence of benefits from other jurisdictions, especially other developing countries would be great both on MNCs operating in India and Indian companies working domestically

Anticipated Outcomes

The session should explore the different elements that companies should consider when working to integrate human rights internally and across operations, studied and explained in the Indian context on Business and human rights. The session will also provide guidance on compiling the Indian version of the “Business and Human Rights” Blueprint.

Programme Outline

  • Setting the scene – Human Rights and Business
  • The global context of business & human rights
  • The Indian context of business & human rights
  • Evidence of benefits on a Business and Human Rights approach
  • Engaging the audience
  • Applying the UN Guiding principles in the Indian context

Speakers Profiles

TO BE UPDATED

Co-Host(s) Profile(s)

CSR Europe is The European Business Network for Corporate Social Responsibility. Through its network of 48 corporate members and 42 National CSR organisations, it gathers over 10,000 companies, and acts as a platform for those businesses looking to enhance sustainable growth and positively contribute to society. In its mission to bring the sustainability agenda forward, CSR Europe goes beyond European borders and cooperates with CSR organisations in other regions across the world. CSR Europe builds on its Enterprise 2020 Initiative with the Sustainable Business Exchange which incubates multi-stakeholder initiatives that tackle the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Date: 17th November, 2017

Time: 11:30AM-13:00PM

Venue: Silver Oak II, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Host / Co-host : IUCN India

Programme structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Date: 17th November, 2017

Time: 02:00 PM -05:30 PM (with Tea Break)

Venue: Jacaranda II, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Host / Co-host : Traidcraft

Brief:

Over 49 percent of the world’s population are women and almost 40 percent of the global workforce are women[1]. Yet on a global scale, women and girls continue to fight an uphill battle against gender inequality. Besides a host of other things, women don’t have equal access to education, finance, opportunities and resources. This debate has become even more important with the announcement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), part of the wider 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. So, to achieve sustainability, it is imperative that all companies, governments and organisations enable women to participate in and profit from trade and business. A range of sustainability standards (perhaps too many!) currently exist in the market place and this has definitely enabled changes at the environmental, economic and social levels. While there is little wrong with the standards themselves, their application often seems to pay lip service to core issues, in order to gain deferential market entry. These standards therefore need to do much more to change the status quo and effect deeper change.

Objectives:

  • To bring to the foreground the need for women’s empowerment to achieve sustainability.
  • To share experiences of stakeholders on the different models and standards that are being used to address the issue of women’s empowerment in business, and
  • To explore the potential solutions to address the challenges that businesses & organisations face to deliver this change.

The proposed structure

No Topic
1 Introduction to the session topic and Panel
2 Panelist speakers present their perspective, issues, challenges and best practices example
3 Wrap-up of the Panel, introduction of the group exercise and deliverables expected
4 Small group exercise – 3 groups led by one of the panel members
5 Presentation of outcome of the group exercise
6 Way forward, action plans and Q&A

Speakers : To be updated

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Programme Structure:  TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON

Date: 17 November, 2017

Time: 4:00PM-5:30PM

Venue: Silver Oak I, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi

Host / Co-host: Rainforest Alliance

Session Brief:

The growth of sustainability over the last several years has created a strong market for voluntary standards. The leading ISEAL members across the agricultural field- Fairtrade, Rainforest Alliance and UTZ- have all recorded growing numbers year on year of certified farms and smallholder groups. Other voluntary standards have also grown; in India, Trustea is an example, with now the largest volume of certified tea.

These certification systems compete with one another for market share. Usually it is the brand companies that drive demand for a certification scheme, selecting the one that most closely matches their brand positioning and-or is strong in their important markets. Retail companies are increasingly using certification schemes for their own brands. Some brand companies do work with more than one certification. For example, Unilever and Tata Global Beverages buy Rainforest Alliance certified tea for export markets and also certify with Trustea for sale in India. Mars Incorporated, one of the largest chocolate companies, has different products in European markets with Fairtrade, Rainforest Alliance and UTZ certification seals. More often, a company selects one scheme and hence the competition to secure that preference is very strong.

This competitive situation though has drawbacks. For producers, it can imply cost and complication. They may need to meet more than one certification standard to fulfill requirements of different customers; and those markets are not always sustained. This can imply investments that are not supported by a long-term return. Traders and processors need to train technicians in different systems and manage different operations- for example, rules on segregation of different materials are not always the same among schemes. Brands are concerned that customers are confused by different seals and as a result give less value to them.

In this context, certification schemes and ISEAL Alliance have made efforts over the years to find efficiencies in their operations. Just as competitive companies often work together to reduce barriers to sustainability which affect them all, so certification schemes also undertake such pre-competitive collaboration to undertake joint research and follow-up discussion on issues, for example pesticides. Schemes sometimes actually support other schemes. For example, Rainforest Alliance is an associate member of the Round Table for Sustainable Palm Oil and sits on two of its working groups. It is likewise a member of the Technical Committee of Trustea. In September 2017, UTZ and Rainforest Alliance announced their intention to merge and form a single sustainable certification scheme.

This session will consider the upsides and downsides of competition and collaboration in voluntary certification and the challenges that arise when schemes attempt to collaborate.

Panel members: Tata Global Beverages, McLeod Russel, ISEAL Alliance (to be confirmed)